Maegan’s Summer Reading Log #5

Alexander Who Used to be Rich Last Sunday by Judith Viorst

So I don’t think Alexander was rich last week. He only had a dollar. To be rich you have to have at least a thousand dollars. If I had a thousand dollars, I would give half of it to charity. Then I would take the other $500 and split it between a Bermuda vacation and buying other stuff, like more books and things from my favorite store, Justice. But it is funny to hear how Alexander spent his one dollar.

A Princess, a Pirate, and One Wild Brother by Cornelia Funke

There are three stories in this book.

One is about a princess named Violet. She has three brothers and their mother died a long time ago. Their father is the king. Her father didn’t know how to raise a girl, so he just treated her the same as his three sons. Later, Violet’s three brothers started to make fun of her because she wasn’t as good at things like using the sword. So Violet practiced in the night in her own, quiet, swift way and became very good. When it was time for her to get married, there was a tournament to see who would be her husband. Violet didn’t like this, so she put herself in as a knight. Her title was “Sir No Name!” Violet’s maid, Emma, stood in as Violet. Violet defeated all the knights and then revealed herself as the true Violet. Violet chose her own prize, to go far away, and she finally married a rose keeper’s son.

The next story is about a pirate girl named Molly. She is going on a little ship to visit her grandmother. The ship runs into some scary pirates. They make her peel the potatoes, scrub their shoes, and srub the deck. Every night, they party on their boat. Molly puts a message in one of the empty rum bottles and sends it out to sea. One night, they partied until dawn and fell asleep on the deck. So Molly stepped through the tangle of arms and legs sleeping on the deck and tossed her message out to sea. One of the pirates heard her and said “Hey, what was that?” But they saw another pirate ship on the horizon. It was her mother, Barbarous Bertha and her scurvy crew. Barbarous Bertha fought and defeated the mean and scurvy pirates. Molly thought up a great punishment for them: they had to peel the potatoes, scrub the boots, and scrub the decks. And Molly was finally able to visit her grandmother.

The third story is called The Wildest Brother. This brother (they don’t tell you his name) has a big sister named Anna. He pretends there are monsters in Anna’s room and she has to hide in the wardrobe until he defeats them. But then he can’t clean up the blood drops on her dresser because there are ghosts moaning in the bathtub again! He makes a lot of messes that he can’t clean up. This brother has to protect Anna from all the wild bears that are going to eat her up while she collects dandelions leaves. He is a wild brother because he pretends all these things and they are not really happening. But the truth is that at night he is scared and crawls into Anna’s bed. And she protects him!

Usborne Book of 100 Illustrated Stories

This book was a surprise for my birthday! I like it as much as my true favorite book, The Usborne Book of Illustrated Fairy Tales. The pictures are very nice. Some of these stories are repeated from my favorite book but there are new ones, too. There are stories of the gods and of fantasy. I love the ribbon book marker.

“My Weird School” series by Dan Guttman, #s 10-13

10 Mr. Docker is Off His Rocker!
11 Mrs. Kormel is Not Normal!
12 Ms. Todd is Odd!
13 Mrs. Patty is Batty!

I still really like reading the “My Weird School” series because it is very funny. It is nothing like my real school. There are very weird teachers that do silly things, like Mr. Docker, who eats bugs, sets his hair on fire, and takes his students on a field trip that is literally a trip to a field. These books are quick and easy to read and I really like the stories.

Isabelle by Lawrence Yep

Isabelle is the American Girl doll of the year for 2014. This book is all about her. Isabelle is a dancer like me and she has blonde hair like me, but hers has pink streaks in it. I do not have pink streaks in my hair. In this story, it is Isabelle’s first year at Anna Heart, a dancing school. It is not an easy year for her because she is falling behind in her dance steps. Her friend Luisa and her teacher help her to catch up. By the end of the story, Isabelle learns that she is a good dancer but she must try her best.

For this post, Mom asked Maegan questions, Maegan talked, and Mom typed.

“And Though She Be But Little, She Is Fierce.” – William Shakespeare

My friends will tell you I am a Pinterest lover. I find it useful and inspirational for cooking, decorating, parenting, and travel. It’s great for Type A planners like me. Recently I have stared following the pinboards of several library groups. This helps me stay on top of new books for the kids and me. Recently it led me to a website called A Mighty Girl, which catalogs “the world’s largest collection of books, toys and movies for smart, confident and courageous young girls.” My favorite page on this site is The Ultimate Guide to the Independent Princess, where I discovered the two books I want to review today.

Last week I picked Brave Margaret: An Irish Adventure and Dangerously Ever After from the library.

Brave Margaret: An Irish Adventure by Robert D. Souci and Sally Wern Comport is a classic folktale with a strong female lead. Margaret seeks adventure and finds love and courage in this beautiful book. The illustrations gorgeous and the pacing of the story makes for a great read-aloud. Halfway through reading this to Maegan I had to flip back and check the date of publication; the story is obviously meant to sound archaic but the language is almost forced. Still, my six year old listened with wide eyes and delighted squeals while I read this exciting story. Seafaring adventure, an old hag, dragons and giants – Brave Margaret has it all!

Meanwhile, back in another kingdom, we read Dangerously Ever After by Dashka Slater and Valeria Docampo, which is the adorable story of Princess Amanita and all the unpleasant things she loves. Amanita is not made of sugar and spice at all, but much fiercer stuff. Amanita’s garden is filled with “prickles and stickles,” plants that sting and plants that stink.

The delightful story of Araminta and her new friend Prince Florian shows that although not all people are necessarily drawn to mainstream interests, we can usually find a common connection if we try. It also highlights some of the dangers of wandering off on your own; having a friend by your side might be the better way to go. Even if you love the scent of a good compost pile, who could not help but be drawn to a place that smells like “sleeping in the sun, staying up late, secrets and summer?” Nice alliterations, and charming illustrations, too. You will hear many giggles from your mighty princes and princesses when they read or hear this story.

This review was written by Robin.

Robin’s Top Ten Picture Books for All Ages

#1 Paul Meets Bernadette by Rosy Lamb

It’s not where you are in life that matters, but who you have beside you.

#2 Tuesday by David Wiesner

All of David Wiesner’s books are wonderful illustrated tales without words. It would make an excellent writing exercise for any age to have students write captions for the pictures. Tuesday tells the story of flying frogs in the middle of the night.

#3 Animalia by Graeme Base

The illustrations in this book take my breath away. It is a lyrical, fantastic alphabet book and so much more.

#4 Question Boy Meets Little Miss Know It All by Peter Catalanotto

An explanation of questions, answers, and what it means to be right.

#5 Click Clack Moo: Cows That Type by Doreen Cronin and Betsy Lewin

What could be funnier than a bunch of literate cows turning Farmer Brown’s life upside down? It’s mutiny in the barn.

#6 Someday by Alison McGhee and Peter H. Reynolds

This book is meant to be shared with someone you love on a red-letter day, but I say don’t wait! Share it with someone today.

#7 Slightly Invisible (Charlie and Lola) by Lauren Child

Do you know how to catch strange and tricky creatures? If not, you must read this definitive manual.

#8 The Gruffalo by Julia Donaldson and Axel Scheffler

In which wit and words save a tiny mouse from a dreadful fate multiple times. Little eyes will become big and round when this is read aloud.

#9 How Droofus the Dragon Lost His Head by Bill Peet

If your friendly and lovable dragon had a price on his head, would you give him up to the king?

#10 Scaredy Squirrel by Melanie Watt

Maegan and I both love Scaredy Squirrel. His planning skills are enviable; however, what they say about the best plans of mice and men also applies to squirrels.